1,600-Year-Old Skeleton Found In Ancient Ruins of Teotihuacan

On early July 2016, a team of archeologists have discovered the 1,600-year-old skeleton of an upper-class woman whose skull was intentionally deformed and teeth were encrusted with mineral stones near Mexico's ancient ruins of Teotihuacan. She was buried in the Barrio Oaxaqueño neighborhood, also known as Tlailotlacan meaning “people from distant lands.” Judging from her extensive body modifications, she lived up to the neighborhood’s billing.

The woman, between 35 and 40 years old when she died, was buried with 19 jars that served as offerings, the National Anthropology and History Institute said. Her cranium was elongated by being compressed in a "very extreme" manner, a technique commonly used in the southern part of Mesoamerica, not the central region where she was found.


Her teeth are of particular note. The central incisors in her upper jaw are embedded with round pyrite stones. This technique required cutting a hole in the enamel of the tooth and inserting the decorative stones. It was practiced in the Mayan cities of southern Mexico (see the jade tooth inserts found in Uxul on the Yucatan peninsula), Guatemala and Belize. One incisor in her lower jaw was replaced with a prosthetic made of serpentine, a green stone carved in the shape of a tooth. This was not of local manufacture and she must have worn it for many years because it shows signs of wear and tartar growth. Researchers are currently studying this tooth looking for evidence of how it was affixed to the jaw, possibly with a cement-like adhesive or some kind of fiber that held it in place.

Her teeth and skull make hers one of the most extensively modified bodies ever discovered at Teotihuacan. It also confirms that the residents of Tlailotlacan weren’t only labourers who were brought to or moved to the big city for work, but people of wealth and status as well. The Lady of Tlailotlacan’s modifications were reserved for the Maya elites.

Sources:

http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/43215

http://phys.org/news/2016-07-skeleton-stone-encrusted-teeth-mexico-ancient.html

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/skeleton-with-stone-encrusted-teeth-found-in-mexico-021359671.html
22:23 | 0 komentar

Squonk

Squonk is a mythical creature reputed to live in the Hemlock forests of northern Pennsylvania. Hunters who have attempted to catch squonks have found that the creature is capable of evading capture by dissolving completely into a pool of tears and bubbles when cornered. The legend holds that the creature's skin is ill-fitting, being covered with warts and other blemishes and that, because it is ashamed of its appearance, it hides from plain sight and spends much of its time weeping.

Legends of squonks probably originated in the late nineteenth century, at the height of Pennsylvania's importance in the timber industry. The distribution was once fairly wide, the usual habitat being high plains where desert vegetation was abundant. History shows beyond dispute that, as these areas gradually changed to swampy, lake-dotted country the Squonk was forced to take to the water. Of distinctly low mentality it traveled constantly around the unacustomed marches in search of fodder. With time, it developed webbing between its toes, but only on the submerged left feet. Hence, on entering the water it could swim only in circles, and never got back to shore. 



The squonk is of a very retiring disposition, generally traveling about at twilight and dusk. Because of its misfitting skin, which is covered with warts and moles, it is always unhappy ; in fact it is said, by people who are best able to judge, to be the most morbid of beast.

Mr. J. P. Wentling, formerly of Pennsylvania, but now at St. Anthony Park, Minnesota, had a disappointing experience with a squonk near Mont Alto. He made a clever capture by mimicking the squonk and inducing it to hop into a sack, in which he was carrying it home, when suddenly the burden lightened and the weeping ceased. Wentling unslung the sack and looked in. There was nothing but tears and bubbles.

Moonlight nights are best for Squonk hunts, for then the animal prefers to lie quiet in its hemlock-home, fearing, should it venture forth, that it may catch a glimpse of itself in some moonlit pool. Sometimes you can hear one weeping softly to himself. The sound is a low note of pleading somewhat resembling the call of the Cross-feathered Snee.

Sources:

http://www.lumberwoods.com/pg31.htm

21:29 | 0 komentar

Legend of The Devil's Column

Located outside the Saint Ambrose church in Milan, Italy. On the left of the basilica’s entrance there’s a single column standing in the middle of a small piazza, in a completely different style than the rest of the buildings in the area. That column is known by the Milanese as the Devil’s Column (Colonna del Diavolo), and is part of one of Milan’s oldest and most beloved legends. The origin of the Column still questionable. It’s not from the Middle Ages, first of all; it’s a Roman ruin, dating back to the second century AD. And while nobody knows much about it.

The story goes, Sant'Ambrogio (Saint Ambrose) (who was not yet saint at the time, but just a simple bishop) was out walking in the garden of the basilica, when the Devil himself appeared. He and Ambrogio had been having issues for a while, you see, what with all the temptations business and the saint being in charge of an entire city in the process of establishing his church.

Ambrogio was kind of a very big deal at the time, so the Devil spent a lot of time trying to corrupt him, which annoyed the bishop to no end. And so Ambrogio, being a practical problem solver, kicked the Devil in the butt and slammed him into the column, where his horns got stuck creating the holes. After trying for a long time to break free, the Devil was able to free himself and frightened, fled. And so, since that day, on the night of Easter’s eve, you can see him on a carriage passing in front of the basilica, dragging the souls of sinners down to Hell. Apparently, the legend is famous enough to attract a small amount of Satanist visitors once holidays come around.


Popular tradition has it that the holes smell of sulfur and placing the ear to the stone you can hear the sounds of Hell. In fact this column was used for the coronation of the German emperors.

According of what Galvano Fiamma said, they swore on the missal, then received the iron crown and embraced this column: "When the King of the Romans want to receive the crown of the Kingdom of Italy in the Basilica Ambrosiana, the Emperor must go first to the marble column that is located at the Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio and a conte of Angera must submit to the Emperor a missal. The Emperor must swear that he will be obedient to the Pope and the Roman Church in things temporal and spiritual. So the Archbishop or abbot of Sant'Ambrogio is crowned with the iron crown as King of Italy.

Sources:

http://folklorethursday.com/legends/italian-folklore-devils-column/

http://www.travelmapitaly.com/italian-legends/legends-of-sant-ambrogio

http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/devils-column

Pic Source:

http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/devils-column
20:50 | 0 komentar

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